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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. very open-minded. unlike for some, there's no question of religion, of color of skin, or anything like that. people can be all beautiful. it depends on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i want to show this
but it's not all about religion. but it's about the complicated layers which makes up the region. the question about iraq, can it or will it regain? is already there. part of the problem in terms of what the government in baghdad is trying to do, it doesn't matter if it's malik your anybody else. he believes in a strong central government. certainly stronger than the constitution which is very weak. and was written by shia and kurds who said never again to a strong central government. but you have a government that functions that can protect the country inhabit as weak as it is and not be able to defend its borders and to project national power. so there are people, and the indy i surveyed that was a pulitzer but that was published in april or may says that maliki, love him or him from a certain more popular than he was six months ago. and his popular including among the sunnis and others who see him, not the election, they, they don't have to like them, it's not a popular to contest. i think the iraqis know that. but they don't know who else is there, and he has taken strong mov
of this campaign without having a heated discussion on race or mormonism or mitt romney's religion, which also a lot of people have issues with. and i almost hope that we get -- we're that close to november 6th. let's get there without this kind of poison becoming part of the political discourse this late on. >> yeah. listen, this is -- >> this isn't something that's being introduced. it's always been there. because we haven't talked about it doesn't mean it isn't there. just means we haven't talked about it. >> i'll say this, when people say there's no evidence that, like lz says, what are you going to believe? me or your lying ears or your lying eyes. you hear things. you know what the insinuations are and then you wonder as i said to you, why put him out there and why after he says a number of crazy things -- and he's not the only one. you don't need a misstep at this point. that is a question. he obviously speaks to some people in the republican party who mitt romney and paul ryan want to go to the voting booths. and that's why he's there continuing to say it. we'll move on. it's a great c
can visit someone in the hospital regardless of your religion or no religion, regardless of who you do or do not sleep with, right, we're talking about the right to be with a loved one, not a gay right to be with a loved one. so that is so important because that's where we're headed because young people already see it that way. it's only older people that you have to get on this thing that it's not about marriage. so i do think it's shifting. i agree that you see the political energy in the democratic party with governor cuomo, as well. i don't think, though, as a legal matter that she they should be on ballots at all. >> again, california has ending the death penalty on there, changing the three strikes law.. >> again, california has ending the death penalty on there, changing the three strikes law.. >> again, california has ending the death penalty on there, changing the three strikes law. things that i as a progressive would be generally supportive of, and yet my concern is when at the show up on ballot measures rather than showing up in our state legislature as did doing the work o
whether they get to eat. religion is banned. there is no rule of law, and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment, punishment, i should add, that is often needed out to the three generations of a person's family , and political offenders knows that when he goes to present his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today in the gulag, and more than a million, perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. the reason we know all of this and much, much more is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans to have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best efforts of the family regime to keep it secret. for more than 50 years, ever since the end of the korean war, north korea has been sealed off from the world's eyes. the family regime has pursued an isolationist policy and it maintains an iron grip on information, access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the government, and its style mu
going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle. >> the tried and true and well-worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> narrator: rejection was at the heart of the experience. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difficult work of knocking on people's doors and pleading with them to listen to you unless you feel like god is with you? >> narrator: and during that time, mitt was worried about the news from home. his father was running for president. >> we would get a hold of the herald tribuand kind of keep up on what was happening. >> narrator: the news was not good. george's campaign was in trouble. he had changed his position on the vietnam
recounts his life in fractalist. in of africa, africa's culture, religion, history and identity. look for these titles in bookstores this coming we can watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> could have wanted more but in the conference can only do so much so want diversity. you want democrats, republicans, different parts of the country. everyone at different ages. we knew on the basis of nine, you can't make generalizations that are 100% certain. we may say as much in the book because conclusions are hypothesis that other people might run with but in order to make those hypotheses we needed a fairly diverse group. >> we also have the white house project for the last couple election cycles and several of the women identified several years before the 2008 election, kathleen sibelius, both in there, and barbara lee has been here several years from now when you did the last round with her foundation and talked about looking at women governors. we wanted to look at women governors who had been through barbara lee's training through the pipeline. we also m
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)